It's a matrix of yarn!

Tonight, Visible Futures Lab staffer  Elizabeth Meiklejohn  prepared another component of her ongoing digital textile experiments by printing onto a matrix of yarn using the Visible Futures Lab's UV printer. Elizabeth first tightly wound her yarn around a custom warping board (laser cut on 1/4 inch clear acrylic using the VFL's laser cutters) to create her printing surface.

Tonight, Visible Futures Lab staffer Elizabeth Meiklejohn prepared another component of her ongoing digital textile experiments by printing onto a matrix of yarn using the Visible Futures Lab's UV printer. Elizabeth first tightly wound her yarn around a custom warping board (laser cut on 1/4 inch clear acrylic using the VFL's laser cutters) to create her printing surface.

Because Elizabeth's images are large and tiled into four sections, her warping board is designed to fold into segments without twisting or crossing any of the yarn threads. After carefully folding the warping board, Elizabeth rigged the board to fit leveled on the UV printer's bed, and proceeded to set up the material as a normal print. By adjusting the printer's overprinting settings, she was able to create a fully saturated print in one pass of the printer instead of three -- great tip!

Because Elizabeth's images are large and tiled into four sections, her warping board is designed to fold into segments without twisting or crossing any of the yarn threads. After carefully folding the warping board, Elizabeth rigged the board to fit leveled on the UV printer's bed, and proceeded to set up the material as a normal print. By adjusting the printer's overprinting settings, she was able to create a fully saturated print in one pass of the printer instead of three -- great tip!

After her print finished, Elizabeth carefully removed the warping board and unfolded it and prepared the other side for printing -- then repeated the process! When combined with another image as the weft of the textile, Elizabeth will see how the two images interact as semi-translucent layers.

After her print finished, Elizabeth carefully removed the warping board and unfolded it and prepared the other side for printing -- then repeated the process! When combined with another image as the weft of the textile, Elizabeth will see how the two images interact as semi-translucent layers.